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Nowadays AV freelancers have become essential to expanding your AV solutions. Accomplished AV freelancers provide your company with expert technical knowledge and more flexibility to take on diverse projects. Your freelance team is an extension of your core business, so it’s only natural that you’d want them to represent your brand well.

The best way you can ensure your company branding remains consistent on site is by making a requirement that your freelancers wear the same brand t-shirts as permanent staff. Why? Well, we’re here to answer that question in full. Read on to get the full scope of how attire works together with your company’s code of conduct and broadcasts your expertise to your clients. 

Company Branding Is Vital

Let’s not mince words here: your company must make ongoing branding a part of its strategy for success. Today’s gig economy has reshaped the way that AV freelancers and your clients interact with one another.

When your AV freelancers wear company apparel on site, they’re acting as ambassadors for your company brand. Their hard work and conscientious behaviour reflect back positively on your company and what technical standards and values you emphasize in your policies. A strong company brand will go a long way toward keeping your candidate and client network healthy and growing.

Not to mention that if you’re vigilant about building a solid company brand, those freelancers that wear your brand will be instilled with a sense of pride. Feeling that they’re part of an influential team will foster greater cooperation between freelancers and permanent staff.

Strengthens Freelancer Accountability

While we’re on the topic of cooperation, having your AV freelancers wear your brand onsite ensures a sense of responsibility and loyalty. Because they are representing your company in a visible way, freelancers are more likely to act according to your code of conduct. Knowing that any poor-quality work or undesirable behaviour to clients reflects on the rest of your company.

Freelancers might sometimes feel as though they are separate entities from your permanent staff, which can lead to feeling as though they are exempt from the code of conduct. There’s more chance for instances of tardiness or even absenteeism without a firm sense of accountability. But when they wear your brand onsite, there’s inherent duty to keep up best practices.

Easier Identification and Communication

The last key point to consider regarding having freelancers wear your brand onsite is about facilitating client interaction. When your freelancers (and indeed any of your staff onsite) wear a recognizable logo or emblem, clients will know exactly who to approach to ask questions and stay updated on the project at hand. You know how hard it is to find and hire freelancers in the first place… you wouldn’t want to make it difficult for your clients to find them onsite, would you?

Client Satisfaction

Really what all the above boils down to is this: by having your freelancers wear your brand you’re being conscious of your customer service. Your freelancers are given the same respect as other staff and as a result they feel loyal, responsible, and confident about delivering on milestones. And when clients can easily interact and troubleshoot with such impeccable technicians, this cements their positive impression of your company.

So seriously consider enforcing a company apparel policy for on site work. You’ll find the benefits are invaluable for your company’s reputation.

the-av-project-managers-survival-guide

Paul Weatherhead

Paul Weatherhead

Prior to founding AV Junction Inc., Paul worked for a tier one AV systems integrator in an operational management capacity for 10 years. His knowledge and experience have helped him oversee hundreds of system integration projects in a variety of industries. Paul’s leadership skills as matched by his sense of humour and easygoing nature. When he’s not at work, you can find him outdoors, exploring new places or spending time with family and friends.

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